The Politics of Phonics: Phonics fundamentalists and balanced literacy true believers

<strong>Former governor Bill Haslam (in a file photo) watched as former Tennessee First Lady Crissy Haslam (in a file photo) presented a book to young Tamera Tynes and mother Sierra Tynes&nbsp;as part of the Books From Birth program.&nbsp;</strong>(The Daily News)

Former governor Bill Haslam (in a file photo) watched as former Tennessee First Lady Crissy Haslam (in a file photo) presented a book to young Tamera Tynes and mother Sierra Tynes as part of the Books From Birth program. (The Daily News)

David Waters
By , Special to the Daily Memphian Updated: May 27, 2021 11:28 AM CT | Published: May 08, 2021 4:00 AM CT Special Report
In partnership with

The Institute for Public Service Reporting

The Institute for Public Service Reporting is based at the University of Memphis and supported financially by U of M, private grants and donations made through the University Foundation. Its work is published by The Daily Memphian through a paid-use agreement. 

Most educators agree reading instruction in the earliest grades should include phonics, but that’s where the disagreements begin.

Topics

literacy reading Tennessee education phonics Crissy Haslam Tennessee literacy
In partnership with
The Institute for Public Service Reporting

The Institute for Public Service Reporting is based at the University of Memphis and supported financially by U of M, private grants and donations made through the University Foundation. Its work is published by The Daily Memphian through a paid-use agreement. 

David Waters

David Waters

David Waters is Distinguished Journalist in Residence and assistant director of the Institute for Public Service Reporting at the University of Memphis.