Opinion: Without Dr. King, the 1968 sanitation strike might have been a footnote

By , Guest Columnist Published: April 02, 2021 4:00 AM CT
<strong>The names of sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968 are engraved on a wall inside the I Am A Man Plaza next to Clayborn Temple.</strong> (Daily Memphian file)

The names of sanitation workers in Memphis in 1968 are engraved on a wall inside the I Am A Man Plaza next to Clayborn Temple. (Daily Memphian file)

“I believe that if Dr. King had not come to Memphis, my father and his co-workers would have been forced to continue to work under the same terrible conditions that led to the senseless deaths of sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole.”

Topics

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I Am A Man Plaza 1968 Sanitation Strike COVID

Johnnie Mosley

Johnnie Mosley is a native Memphian and founder of Citizens For Better Service. He is the son of John C. White, a Memphis sanitation worker for five decades.

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