The Politics of Phonics: Power, profit and politics guide reading

<strong>President George W. Bush observed a moment of silence on Sept. 11, 2001, at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida, for victims of the terrorist attacks. Bush had chosen the school in one of Sarasota's poorest neighborhoods to launch a national reading campaign. Though the day&nbsp;forever altered Bush&rsquo;s presidential priorities, it didn&rsquo;t end his push for education reform.</strong> (Chris O'Meara/AP file)

President George W. Bush observed a moment of silence on Sept. 11, 2001, at the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida, for victims of the terrorist attacks. Bush had chosen the school in one of Sarasota's poorest neighborhoods to launch a national reading campaign. Though the day forever altered Bush’s presidential priorities, it didn’t end his push for education reform. (Chris O'Meara/AP file)

David Waters
By , Special to the Daily Memphian | Published: May 06, 2021 4:00 AM CT Special Report
In partnership with

The Institute for Public Service Reporting

The Institute for Public Service Reporting is based at the University of Memphis and supported financially by U of M, private grants and donations made through the University Foundation. Its work is published by The Daily Memphian through a paid-use agreement. 

Tennessee’s new elementary school reading policies are the product of a tangled web of government, business and academics that has reshaped national and state reading policies time and again.

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Topics

phonics reading Education
In partnership with
The Institute for Public Service Reporting

The Institute for Public Service Reporting is based at the University of Memphis and supported financially by U of M, private grants and donations made through the University Foundation. Its work is published by The Daily Memphian through a paid-use agreement. 

David Waters

David Waters

David Waters is Distinguished Journalist in Residence and assistant director of the Institute for Public Service Reporting at the University of Memphis.


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