Some call it a pandemic of grief

COVID quarantine kept many from saying goodbye to dying loved ones, finding closure

By , Special to the Daily Memphian Updated: October 31, 2021 7:02 PM CT | Published: October 31, 2021 4:00 AM CT
<strong>Jason Porter, holding a portrait of his parents, James W. and Pauline Porter,&nbsp; struggled with his faith after his mother&rsquo;s death last year. He could not be with her due to COVID restrictions, and she died alone. &ldquo;With God&rsquo;s strength, I was able to find my way back to peace of mind. God hadn&rsquo;t done anything to me. I got to that place.&rdquo;</strong> (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian)

Jason Porter, holding a portrait of his parents, James W. and Pauline Porter, struggled with his faith after his mother’s death last year. He could not be with her due to COVID restrictions, and she died alone. “With God’s strength, I was able to find my way back to peace of mind. God hadn’t done anything to me. I got to that place.” (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian)

Even persons of faith can struggle with being unable to be physically present and say goodbye to loved ones.

Topics

COVID grief pandemic coronavirus grief Jason Porter
Toni Lepeska

Toni Lepeska

Toni Lepeska is a freelance reporter for The Daily Memphian. The 32-year veteran of newspaper journalism covers a diversity of topics, always seeking to reveal the human story behind the news. Toni, who grew up in Cayce, Mississippi, is a graduate of the University of Mississippi. To learn more, visit tonilepeska.com


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